At Little Foxes we operate a Key Person system. This means that a nominated member of staff will have special responsibility for your child. In case of your Key Person being on holiday or sickness there will be a named secondary Key Person.At Little Foxes we operate a Key Person system. This means that a nominated member of staff will have special responsibility for your child. In case of your Key Person being on holiday or sickness there will be a named secondary Key Person.

The key person will be chosen throughout the child’s first pre-visit to ensure stability for the child and parents once the child starts attending Little Foxes.  If the child shows preference to other staff member key person may be changed.

The Key Person will settle your child into nursery life and make the transition from home to nursery as easy as possible. They will be responsible for meeting their direct and indirect needs. The Key Person will communicate regularly with you regarding what your child has been doing whilst in nursery and also discuss their progress with you. The Key Person will complete a settling in review so that you can see how your child is settling.  Your child’s key person is also responsible for completing an “on entry” assessment of your child’s development this give their key person a baseline of development to enable them to further your child’s progress this will be completed in conjunction with parents on one of your child’s pre visits.
As your child moves to different rooms within nursery their Key Person will change at this stage the parent will be involved in the transition arrangements through a meeting held with your child’s current key person and their new key person in the next room. Also as they progress in age their Key person may change. This will include updating your personal details.

The importance of the key person

 

“It’s like you are sort of their second mum as such because you’re like their parent during the day because you do everything with them that their parent would do with them on a Saturday or Sunday or any other day that they don’t come in so it’s like you’ve sort of really got that backstage role it is sort of similar I suppose…”(Elfer, 2008)

Elements to constitute being a key person;

  • Developing secure and trusting relationships with your key child and their families
  • Interacting age appropriately with your key child.
  • Providing a secure base for your key child – being physically and emotionally available to them.● Comforting distressed children.
  • Acknowledging and allowing children to express their feelings.
  • Settling your key children in gradually.
  • Changing and toileting your key children – using sensitive handling and familiar words.
  • Meeting your key child’s hygiene needs – offering help and improving independance.
  • Support the child in transitions.
  • Take detailed observations of your key child.
  • Identify and plan for children’s development and learning needs.
  • Play alongside children
  • Help children to resolve any conflict through reasoning and talking.
  • Share information with parents regarding children’s next steps in learning.
  • Provide information to aid the tracking of children’s progress.
  • Attend to children’s personal needs wherever possible.
  • Inform other practitioners of important information that they need to know regarding children.
  • Raise any concerns about a child’s development and assist in providing the help they need.
  • To have special key group time.